Our Exciting

Our Exciting Collection

The Aviation Heritage Museum’s collection includes many aircraft, some commemorating the efforts of Australian airmen in the defence of the country, some reminding us of the long history of aviation in Australia. 

Below are just a few of our main attractions with many more aircraft on display. 

AVRO ANSON

The Anson was built to British Air Ministry Specification 18/35 and is reputed to be the first British monoplane to have a retractable undercarriage.

AVRO LANCASTER

The Avro Lancaster or "Lanc" or "Lankie" as it became affectionately known became the most famous and most successful of the Second World War night bombers.

AHM Huey

Bell UH-1H Iroquois (Huey)

Arriving at the museum in July 2014, the Huey is currently on display near the entrance of the Aviation Heritage Museum located in the southern hanger.

AHM Canberra

Canberra

Our Mk20 Canberra was built at Fisherman's Bend, Victoria and saw active military duty in Malaya with No. 2 Squadron and was deployed to Vietnam on April 19th 1967.

Catalina

The Consolidated Catalina was designed around the concept of a "Maritime Patrol Bomber", with a long range enabling it to harass enemy shipping, particularly in the Pacific.

AHM Dakota C47

DAKOTA C47

The Dakota served in all theatres of World War II, notably flying supplies to from India to China over the mountains and ferrying paratroops to Europe as part of the 1944 D-day landings.

MB-326H (THE MACCHI)

The MB-326 was developed to satisfy an AMI (Italian Air Force) requirement, winning a contest against the Fiat G-80 to become their standard jet trainer. It was designed to be simple, light and robust.

AHM Spitfire

SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE

The Museum is home to an original Spitfire, as well as a replica. The original, a Mark 22, PK481, entered service with the RAF on September 3, 1945, and served with several squadrons including 611 before being withdrawn from service in 1953.

AHM Tigermoth

TIGER MOTH

The aircraft on display originally bore the RAAF serial number A17-161. It was built in NSW and entered service with the RAAF in October 22th, 1940. After the war, it was used by Farmair Pty Ltd as a crop sprayer, until replaced in 1965.

AHM Vampire

VAMPIRE

The Vampire was the second jet aircraft to enter RAF service, just one month before the end of World War II in Europe, and as a result did not see active service at the time. It was donated to the Museum on 28 May 1970.

AHM Wackett

WACKETT CA-6

The Wackett was designed in response to a 1938 RAAF requirement for a trainer to supplement its existing fleet. The specification called for a low-winged monoplane with an enclosed cockpit (unlike the more commonly-used Tiger Moth).

AHM Wirraway

WIRRAWAY CA-5

Wirraways were mainly operated as advanced trainers during World War II, but in the early stages of the Pacific war, some saw action against Japanese fighters and bombers - with only a little success, and many losses.

Other Aviation Heritage Museum displays

Aviation Heritage Museum's aircraft collection
Aviation history and education
Aviation Heritage Museum aircraft collection
Conserving aviation artefacts
Interactive displays
Interactive displays
Aviation Heritage Museum aircraft collection
Commemoration displays
Aircraft model collections
Commemoration displays
Aviation Heritage Museum's engine collection
Aviation Heritage Museum's engine collection

Avro Anson

Aircraft description

The Anson was built to British Air Ministry Specification 18/35 and is reputed to be the first British monoplane to have a retractable undercarriage. Although this made it a significant advance on its introduction, it was well obsolete for operational work by the commencement of World War II. While it scored some successes in its initial coastal patrol duties, its main contribution to the war effort was in the training of crews for British heavy bombers.

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) followed suit, operating 1020 Ansons from November 1935 for training purposes.

Post-war, many Ansons continued to operate as small airliners, carrying typically 8 passengers on minor air routes, particularly in Britain and Australia. Small numbers were also operated by many national air forces. One of the Anson’s most famous post-war roles was the transport of passengers and goods to and from Rottnest Island, with Woods Airways.

The museum’s Anson was manufactured in Britain and shipped to Australia in May 1941. It was used at the large flying training base at Geraldton where pilots learned to fly multi-engine aeroplanes, and for navigation and radio training.

After the war ended in August 1945 many Ansons were sold to the public. The one on display was bought by the Flying Doctor Service for £250, operated out of Kalgoorlie by George Lewis who had pioneered flying doctor services there.

By 1962 the Anson’s glued wooden wing spars were in danger of disintegrating due to age, so they were grounded. Lewis made a farewell circuit of Kalgoorlie in the Anson on 30 June 1962. He sold it to the Kalgoorlie branch of the Air Training Corps for 6 pence (5 cents) in 1963. The Anson was donated to the Museum in 1970 and moved to Perth where it was stored before being restored, from 1983. It now bears the same markings and colours it had when it first flew in Australia for the RAAF during the war. The museum’s aircraft, W2121, served at No 4 Service Flying Training School at RAAF Geraldton, Western Australia.

Technical information

Status: On display 

Type: Multi-role (mainly coastal patrol and crew trainer) 

Maiden flight: 24 March 1935 

Primary users: RAF, RAAF 

Manufacturer: A.V. Roe and sons 

Number Built:  

Civil Registration: VH-WAC 

 

Length: 12.08 m ( 42 ft 3 in) 

Height: 3.99 m (13 ft 1 in) 

Wingspan: 17.22 m (56 ft 6 in) 

Powerplant: (Anson Mark I) two 260 kW (350 HP) Armstrong Siddeley Cheetah radial engines 

Weight: Empty 2500 kg (5500 lb), max loaded 3900 kg (8500 lb) 

Maximum Speed: 303 km/h (188 mph) 

Range: 1300km (790 mi) 

Service Ceiling: 5800 m (19000 ft) 

Power/mass ratio: 140W/kg (0.88 HP/lb) 

Avro Lancaster

Aircraft description

The Avro Lancaster has its origins in the shortcomings of its predecessor, the Avro Manchester, a heavy bombing aircraft designed to UK Air Ministry Specification P.13/36.
The performance and load-carrying capacity of the Lancaster meant that it was chosen for many “special” operations, such as the Dam Buster raids on the Rhine Valley dams in 1943, pathfinder operations marking targets for the main bomber force, and daylight precision bombing raids using the large “Tallboy” (12,000 pound) and “Grand Slam” (22,000 pound) bombs.

The “Lanc” or “Lankie,” as it became affectionately known became the most famous and most successful of the Second World War night bombers, reputedly “delivering 608,612 tons of bombs in 156,000 sorties”.

The Mark VII, of which the Museum’s aircraft is an example, was the final production version, with the dorsal turret moved slightly forward and the tail turret’s four 0.303-inch machine guns replaced by two of 0.5 inch calibre. This mark was designed to be more suitable for operation in the tropics, as part of “Tiger Force”, the British contribution to the invasion of Japan (and so never being required).

See for yourself the most famous Allied bomber of the Second World War, the Avro Lancaster, and discover more about its history at the RAAFA Aviation Heritage Museum! View our opening times and plan your visit here.

Technical information

Status: On display

Type: Heavy bomber

Maiden flight: January 1941

Primary users: RAF

Manufacturer: A.V. Roe and sons

Number Built: 7,377

Civil Registration:

Length: 21.18 m (69 ft 5 in)

Height: 5.97 m (19 ft 7 in)

Wingspan: 31.09 m (102 ft)

Powerplant: Rolls-Royce Merlin XX V12 engines, 1,280 hp (954 kW) each

Empty Weight: 16,705 kg (36 828 lb)

Loaded Weight: 29,000 kg (63,000 lb)

Maximum Speed: 240 knots (450 km/h, 280 mph) at 5,600 m (15,000 ft)

Range: 2,300 nm (4,300 km, 2,700 mi) with minimal bomb load

Service Ceiling: 8,160 m (23,500 ft)

Power/mass ratio: 130 W/kg (0.081 hp/lb)

Bell UH-1H Iroquois (Huey)

Aircraft description

This particular aircraft, A2-296 was delivered to the RAAF in November 1973 and allocated to the 35 Squadron at Townsville, Queensland. Later it served with 5 Squadron at RAAF Fairbairn Canberra.

The aircraft was transferred to the Army Aviation Corps in January 1990, where it served with 171 Squadron, 1st Aviation Regiment at Oakley Queensland.

The craft was then allocated and flown to the Aircraft Research and Development Unit (ARDU) at Edinburgh AFB, South Australia in August 2007. Its last flight was from Edinburgh to Archerfield, Brisbane on the 12th of December 2007.

Finally, it was inhibited and placed into storage at Meeandah, Queensland, before being allocated to the RAAFA Aviation Heritage Museum at Bull Creek Western Australia in 2012. The aircraft arrived at the Museum on 29 July 2014, you can view it today in the southern hanger of the museum near the entrance.

Technical information

Status: On display

Type:

Maiden flight:

Primary users:

Manufacturer: Bell Helicopter Textron (USA)

Number Built:

Civil Registration:

Length: 17.398m (57ft)

Height: 4.39522m (14ft)

Rotor Diameter: 14.6304m (48ft)

Powerplant: Lycoming T53-L-13 engine

Empty Weight: 2365.52kg (5,215lbs)

Loaded Weight: 4100.54kg (9,040lbs)

Maximum Speed: 217.215km/h

Range: 506.835km (315miles)

Service Ceiling:

Power/mass ratio:

Canberra

Aircraft description

The Aviation Heritage Museum is home to a Mk20 Canberra, serial number A84-230. This aircraft was built at Fishermen’s Bend, Victoria, under license by the Government Aircraft Factory (GAF) in 1955 and began service with the RAAF on 12th March 1957.

This Mk20 Canberra saw active military duty in Malaya with No. 2 Squadron and was deployed to Vietnam on April 19th 1967. It returned to Amberley Air Force Base on February 26th 1971, where it then served as a photo reconnaissance aircraft until being retired. The aircraft was donated to the Museum on December 17th 1983 by the Australian Government.

The Canberra’s development was the result of a 1944 RAF requirement for a jet bomber to fulfil the role of the wartime de Havilland Mosquito.

A British tradition existed of naming its bomber aircraft after cities (such as Lancaster and Stirling). The RAAF showed an early interest in the aircraft, which led the chairman of English Electric, Sir George Nelson, proposing the name “Canberra” for the new bomber.

The Australia version, the Canberra B.20, was manufactured under license by the Government Aircraft Factory (GAF). It was based on the production model, but possessed a modified wing leading edge, and increased fuel capacity.

Next to the RAF, the largest user of the Canberra was the USAF, where a license-built version of the Canberra was developed. Operational Service RAAF Canberras in the Vietnam war served beside the US version, the Martin B-57, which proved equally suited to the operational conditions.

Discover more about this aircraft, it’s comparisons to the Mosquito, how it was used by the RAAF and other countries and life after war-service on your visit to the Aviation Heritage Museum.

Technical information

Status: On display

Type: 3 seat bomber aircraft, also used for photo reconnaissance

Maiden flight: 13 May 1949

Primary users: Royal Air Force, Argentine Air Force, Royal Australian Air Force, Indian Air Force, United States Air Force

Manufacturer: English Electric (original), RAAF aircraft by Govt Aircraft Factory (Aust – under license)

Number Built: 1,352 (901 UK, 48 Australia, 403 USA)

Civil Registration:

Length: 19.96 m (65 ft 6 in)

Height: 4.77 m (15 ft 8 in)

Wingspan: 19.51 m (64 ft 0 in)

Powerplant: 2, Rolls-Royce Avon R.A.7 Mk.109 turbojets, 7,400 lbf (36 kN) each

Empty Weight: 9,820 kg (21,650 lb)

Maximum Take-off: 25,000 kg (55,000 lb)

Maximum Speed: 933 km/h (580 mph) at 12,192 m (40,000 ft)

Range: combat radius 1,300 km (700 nm, 810 mi)

Ferry range: 5,440 km (2,940 nm, 3,380 mi)

Service Ceiling: 15,000 m (48,000 ft)

Power/mass ratio:

Catalina

Aircraft description

The Consolidated Catalina was designed around the concept of a “Maritime Patrol Bomber”, with a long range enabling it to harass enemy shipping, particularly in the Pacific. It was a response to a US Navy requirement, winning a competition against a similar Douglas design, mainly on the basis of lower cost.

In World War II, Catalinas operated not only over the Pacific, but also the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. Their duties in the Atlantic theatre were mainly convoy escort, where their long endurance saw them given the role on the dangerous route to Murmansk in Russia.

The RAAF used Catalinas in a wide range of roles including reconnaissance and anti-submarine patrols, offensive mine-laying and air-sea rescue. In addition, Catalina aircraft were used to transport Australian personnel back to Australia at the end of the war.

The RAAF also occasionally used Catalinas to mount nuisance night bombing raids on Japanese bases, including the major base at Rabaul, New Guinea.

The RAAF retired its last Catalina in 1952.

During World War II, Catalinas provided a crucial air link between Australia and Sri Lanka (then Ceylon), and so Europe. Carrying additional fuel tanks and stripped of unnecessary weight, Catalinas operated by Qantas flew the route from Perth to Colombo, operating the world’s longest regular non-stop service. These missions were flown in complete radio silence and without any radio navigation aids.

Can you imagine making this flight in a Catalina? See one for yourself and gain an understanding of what this trip would have been like in the 1940s at the Aviation Heritage Museum.

View the fascinating and detailed history of this popular aircraft at its display in the Museum. Here you can discover more regarding their role and successes in the Pacific during WWII, post-war uses of the aircraft and the Catalinas local operating history in Perth.

Technical information

Status: On display

Type: Maritime Patrol Flying Boat

Maiden flight: March 28, 1935

Primary users: US Navy, USAAF, RAF, RCAF, RAAF

Manufacturer: Consolidated Aircraft

Number Built: 4051

Civil Registration:

Length: 19.46 m (63 ft 10 in)

Height: 6.16 m (21 ft 1 in)

Wingspan: 31.7 m (104 ft)

Powerplant: Two 1,200 hp (895 kW) Pratt & WhitneyR-1830-92 Twin Wasp radial engines

Empty Weight: 9485 kg (20910 lb)

Loaded Weight: 16066 kg (35420 lb)

Maximum Speed: 314 km/h (196 mph)

Range: 4030 km (2520 mi)

Service Ceiling: 4000 m (15800 ft)

Power/mass ratio:

Dakota C47

Aircraft description

The Dakota was descended from the early DC-1, DC-2 and DC-3 series of Douglas transport aircraft.

Over 400 DC-3s were ordered by US airlines before World War II. When the war arrived, it was logical for it to form the backbone of the USAAF Air Transport Command.

In RAF wartime service, it was named the Dakota, a name which has prevailed in common usage over the US name, “Skytrain”. The RAAF took delivery of its first Dakotas in February 1943 (in all about 124 were procured), and the RCAF also flew them.

The Dakota served in all theatres of World War II, notably flying supplies to from India to China over the mountains, known as “The Hump”, and ferrying paratroops to Europe as part of the 1944 D-day landings.

Post war, the surviving Dakotas became available to civilian operators at very low prices.

DC-3s remain in service, generally in limited forms of operation (for example, special joy flights), to this day.

Dakotas remained in military service for many years. The RAAF found many uses for the aging but versatile Dakota and did not retire its last until March 1999. The CSIRO made good use of the aircraft in its research work, in studies such as the use of cloud seeding for rainmaking and laser mapping of coastal water depths.

During the Vietnam war, re-engineered versions of the aircraft were used not only as a transport, but also as an electronic countermeasures aircraft and an airborne machine gun post. In both of these applications, its robustness and slow speeds gave it advantages over more modern aircraft.

The Dakota on display in the Museum is a C-47B, serial number A65-124. It was the last Dakota received by the RAAF, commencing in 1945. Since then, it has served in Papua New Guinea, Korea, Malaysia and Australia – including a 5-year stint patrolling the North West Coast of WA. The Museum took delivery of the aircraft on June 7th, 1981.

Experience for yourself the history of the Dakota aircraft and learn about the various models engineered over time for different uses, its history in war and as a passenger aircraft.

Technical information

Status: On display

Type: Military transport (C47) or commercial transport (DC3)

Maiden flight: DC 1 (forerunner to development of C47) 1st July 1933

Primary users: United States Army Air Force, US Air Force, RAF, RAAF and many other air forces and airlines.

Manufacturer: Douglas Aircraft Company

Number Built: US Manufacture 10,655 + Soviet (Li-2) 4,937 + Japanese (L2D) 487 = Total 16,079

Civil Registration:

Length: 19.43 m (63 ft 9 in)

Height: 5.18 m (17 ft 0 in)

Wingspan: 29.11 m (95 ft 6 in)

Powerplant: 2, Pratt & Whitney R-1830-90C “Twin Wasp” 14-cylinder radial engines, 1,200 hp (895 kW) each

Empty Weight: 8040 kg (17,720 lb)

Loaded Weight: 12,200 kg (26,900 lb)

Maximum Speed: 360 km/h (195 knots, 224 mph)

Range: 2,600 km (1,400 nm, 1,600 mi)

Service Ceiling: 8,050 m (26,400 ft)

Power/mass ratio:

MB-326H (The Macchi)

Aircraft description

The MB-326 was developed to satisfy an AMI (Italian Air Force) requirement, winning a contest against the Fiat G-80 to become their standard jet trainer. From the outset, it was designed to be simple, light and robust, the prototype achieving fair performance from its Armstrong Siddeley Viper turbojet, initially of only 1,750 lb thrust.

The RAAF version was the MB-326H, essentially an Italian MB-326G with upgraded avionics. Only 12 were fully built by Aermacchi, another 18 delivered as kits and a further 67 built by the Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation.

The Macchi in the museum was previously based at Pearce, with No. 25 (City of Perth) Squadron. When plans commenced to replace the Macchi as the RAAF’s jet trainer, the museum asked for a donation of one for display and the aircraft was delivered on June 15, 2002.

Technical information

Status: On display

Type: Two-seat basic trainer

Maiden Flight: December 10, 1957

Primary users: Italian, Brazilian, Australian and South African air forces all operated about 100 or more each

Manufacturer: Aermacchi

Number Built:

Civil Registration:

Length: 10.65 m (34 ft 11 in)

Height: 3.72 m (12 ft 2½ in)

Wingspan: 10.56 m (34 ft 8 in)

Powerplant: Bristol Siddeley / Rolls Royce Viper Mk.11 turbojet, 11.1 kN (2,500 lbf)

Empty Weight: 2,237 kg (4,930 lb)

Loaded Weight: 3,765 kg (8,300 lb)

Maximum Speed: 806 km/h (436 knots, 501 mph) at 4,575m (15,000 ft)

Range: 1,665 km (900 nautical mile, 1,035 miles)

Service Ceiling: 12,500 m (41,000 ft)

Power/mass ratio:

Supermarine Spitfire

Aircraft description

The Museum is home to an original Spitfire, as well as a replica. The original, a Mark 22, PK481, is to be found in our North Wing. It entered service with the RAF on September 3, 1945, and served with several squadrons including 611 before being withdrawn from service in 1953.

A major feature of the Spitfire, is its elliptical-planform wing. Such a wing was known to minimise induced drag and had previously been used for some German Junkers designs. However, there may have been more a pragmatic reason behind the choice, namely the length of the new wing-mounted machine guns: it is reputed that at one stage the designer said, “I don’t care what shape the wing is, as long as it covers the guns!”.

The construction of the Spitfire, all-metal with a complex wing spar structure, was novel, so that it was some time before the first production models appeared. It was not until June 1938 that they began to flow to the RAF, when 19 Squadron received their first deliveries.

The construction of the Spitfire, all-metal with a complex wing spar structure, was novel, so that it was some time before the first production models appeared. It was not until June 1938 that they began to flow to the RAF, when 19 Squadron received their first deliveries.

The Seafire was the Royal Navy’s version, the first versions being basically a Spitfire with a tail hook; the wings were initially not foldable, so the early Seafires remained on deck in all weathers. This was corrected in the Seafire Mark III of 1943, over 1,200 of these being built.

For service in the African and Asian theatres, Spitfires needed additional oil cooling, so “tropicalised” versions can be identified in photographs by a projecting “chin” holding the oil cooler.

With the advent of the RAF’s new jet fighters, the Spitfire became obsolete. However, it saw post-war service with many other air arms, being progressively retired through the 1950s.

Spitfires last saw combat during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, when, in a strange twist, Israeli Air Force Spitfires fought against Egyptian and Royal Air Force Spitfires.

Discover more about the original Spitfire on display’s life after the war, the origins of these aircraft and story during World War II as a highlight of your Museum visit.

Technical information

Status: On display

Type: Single seat fighter

Maiden Flight: 5th March, 1936

Primary users: RAF

Manufacturer: Vickers Armstrong

Number Built: 20,351

Civil Registration:

General characteristics
Mark
I
V
IX
XIV
24
Length
29 ft 9 in (9.10m)
29ft 11in (9.12m)
30 ft 0 in (9.14m)
32 ft 8 in (9.96m)
32 ft 11 in (10.04m)
Height
8 ft 10 in (2.69m)
11ft 5 in (3.50m)
12 ft 8 in (3.86m)
13 ft 6 in (4.11m)
Wingspan
36 ft 10 in (11.23m)
36 ft 10 in (11.23m)
36 ft 10 in (11.23m)
36 ft 10 in (11.23m)
36 ft 11 in (11.25m)
Powerplant
Rolls-Royce MerlinII, 1, 224 hp at 12,250 ft (kW at m)
Rolls-Royce Merlin 45, 14,470 hp at 9,250 ft (1,096 kW at 2,820m)
Rolls-Royce Merlin 70, 1,655 hp at 10,000 ft (1,096 kW at 2,820m)
Rolls-Royce Griffon 65, 2,035 hp at 7,000 ft
Rolls-Royce Griffon 61, 2,375 hp at 1,250 ft
Weight
empty 4,482 lb (kg), loaded 5,819 lb (kg)
empty 5,033 lb (kg), loaded 6,954 lb (kg)
empty 5,749 lb (kg), loaded 7,480 lb (kg)
empty 6,510 lb (kg), loaded 8,600 lb (kg)
empty 7,160 lb (kg), loaded 9,900 lb (kg)
Performance
Mark
I
V
IX
XIV
24
Maximum speed
361 mph (581 km/h)
374 mph (602 km.h)
415 mph (668 km/h)
439 mph (707 km/h)
450 mph (724 km/h)
Range
395 mi (635 km)
470 mi (760 km)
434 mi (700 km)
525 mi (860 km)
580 mmi (930 km)
Service ceiling
31,900 ft (9,700 m)
36,400 ft (11,100 m)
41,000 ft (12,500 m)
43,000 ft (13,100 m)
43,000 ft (13,100 m)
Rate of climb
2,530 ft/min (12.8 m/s)
2,900 ft/min (13.5 m/s)
4,530 ft/min (23 m/s)
4,700 ft/min (23.9 m/s)
4,900 ft/min (24.9 m/s)
Armament
Mark
I
V
IX
XIV
24
Guns
8, 0.303 in Browning machine guns
2, 20 mm Hispano cannon and 4, 0303 inch Browning machine guns (“B wing”)
2, 20 mm Hispano cannon and 4, 0.303 inch Browning machine guns
2, 20 mm Hispano cannon and 2, 0.5 inch Browning machine guns
4, 20 mm Hispano cannon

DH82A Tiger Moth

Aircraft description

By the start of World War II, the RAF was operating about 500 Tiger Moths. This number increased rapidly with the addition of civilian aircraft and increased manufacture. Over 7,000 were built in Britain, 1523 in Canada as the DH 82C and a further 200 for the USAAF as the PT-24. Other countries, including Australia, also manufactured Tiger Moths under licence.

The Canadian Tiger Moths were modified to suit a colder climate, particularly with an enclosed, sliding canopy, and some versions using ski or float landing gear.

A post-war conversion, the Thruxton Jackaroo, possessed a widened and enclosed cabin for four occupants. Post-war War-surplus Tiger Moths were widely used in the late 1940s and 1950s for pilot training by flying clubs, not only in Britain but also Australia, New Zealand and Canada. They also were used as agricultural aircraft; the front seat being replaced by a hopper containing a chemical spray mixture or dry superphosphate fertiliser. The Tiger Moth served well in these roles, only being phased out in the early 1960s.

Surviving Tiger Moths remain in use by many private pilots, their aerobatic capabilities, ease of handling and open cockpits making them widely popular.

The aircraft on display at the museum originally bore the RAAF serial number A17-161. It was built in NSW and entered service with the RAAF in October 22th, 1940 after finishing its service at No 9 Elementary Flying Training School at RAAF Cunderdin in Western Australia. After the war, it was used by Farmair Pty Ltd as a crop sprayer, until replaced in 1965. The aircraft is on indefinite loan from Channel 7 and arrived at the museum in 1984.

View this exciting aircraft and discover more on the development of the Tiger Moth and modifications to the original design on your next visit.

Technical information

Status: On display

Type: Two-seat trainer

Maiden Flight: 26th October 1931

Primary users: Royal Air Force, Fleet Air Arm, Royal Australian Air Force, Royal New Zealand Air Force, Royal Canadian Air Force, plus numerous others, military & civil

Manufacturer: de Havilland Aircraft Company

Number Built: In excess of 8,000

Civil Registration:

Length: 7.34 m (23 ft 11 in)

Height: 2.68 m (8 ft 9 in)

Wingspan: 8.94 m (29 ft 4 in)

Powerplant: de Havilland Gipsy Major I inverted 4-cylinder inline, 130 hp (100 kW)

Empty Weight: 506 kg (1,115 lb)

Maximum Weight: 828 kg (1,825 lb)

Maximum Speed: 175 km/h at 300 m (109 mph at 1,000 ft)

Range: 486 km (302 miles)

Service Ceiling: 4,145 m (3,600 ft)

Power/mass ratio:

Vampire

Aircraft description

The Vampire was the second jet aircraft to enter RAF service, just one month before the end of World War II in Europe, and as a result did not see active service at the time. After the war, it was used for a number of development and demonstration projects, becoming the first jet aircraft to make a landing on and take-off from an aircraft carrier.

The Vampire saw its first active service in Malaya, being used against insurgents in the late 1940s and early 1950s. It was also used in the Rhodesian (Zimbabwe) civil war of 1979.

The Vampire in the Museum is an Australian-built T35A trainer version, construction number 4101, in RAAF service as A79-821. It was donated to the Museum on 28 May 1970 so that today, you can view this striking craft, located in the North Hanger.

Technical information

Status: On display

Type: Two-seat fighter-bomber and advanced trainer

Maiden Flight: 20 September 1943

Primary users: AF (about 1900 fighter version, 731 trainer version), Fleet Air Arm (about 90),

RAAF and RAN, (109 fighter version, 109 trainer version), Switzerland (310), numerous other countries including France (250), Italy (over 100), RNZAF (25)

Manufacturer: de Havilland

Number Built: 3,268 (de Havilland UK)

Civil Registration:

Length: 7.34 m (23 ft 11 in)

Height: 2.68 m (8 ft 9 in)

Wingspan: 8.94 m (29 ft 4 in)

Powerplant: de Havilland Gipsy Major I inverted 4-cylinder inline, 130 hp (100 kW)

Empty Weight: 506 kg (1,115 lb)

Maximum Weight: 828 kg (1,825 lb)

Maximum Speed: 175 km/h at 300 m (109 mph at 1,000 ft)

Range: 486 km (302 miles)

Service Ceiling: 4,145 m (3,600 ft)

Power/mass ratio:

General characteristics
FB6 Fighter bomber
T11 Trainer
Length
30 ft 9 in (9.37 m)
34 ft 5 in (10.5 m)
Height
8 ft 10 in (2.69 m)
6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Wingspan
38 ft (11.58 m)
38 ft (11.58 m)
Powerplant
de Havilland Goblin 3 centrifugal turbojet, 3,350 lbf (14.90 kN)
de Havilland Goblin 35 centrifugal turbojet, 3,500 lbf (15.56 kN)
Weight
empty 7,283 lb (3,304 kg), max takeoff 12,390 lb (5,620 kg)
empty 7,380 lb (3,350 kg), maximum loaded 12,920 lb (5,860 kg)
Performance
FB6 Fighter bomber
T11 Trainer
Maximum speed
548 mph (882 km/h)
538 mph (866 km/h)
Range
1,220 mi (1,960 km)
853 mi (1374 km)
Service ceiling
42,800 ft (13,045 m)
Rate of climb
4,050 ft/min at sea level (206 m/s)
4,500 ft/min at sea level (22.9 m/s)
Armament
FB6 Fighter bomber
T11 Trainer
Cannon
Four 20 mm
Two 20 mm
Bomb load
2,000 lb

Wackett CA-6

Aircraft description

The Wackett was designed in response to a 1938 RAAF requirement for a trainer to supplement its existing fleet. The specification called for a low-winged monoplane with an enclosed cockpit (unlike the more commonly-used Tiger Moth).

Due to their higher performance and more sophisticated equipment (such as a constant-speed propeller), the Wacketts were used as intermediates between the Tiger Moth primary trainers and the Wirraway advanced trainers. Despite in-service problems with the supply of propellers and the development of cracks in the Super Scarab engines, they succeeded in that role until the end of the war.

After the end of World War II, some Wacketts were converted by Kingsford Smith Aviation for use as agricultural aircraft, as the KS-2 and KS-3 Cropmaster (the former with the hopper in the front-seat position, the latter with it aft). A further evolution was the Yeoman Cropmaster, which showed little outward resemblance to its wartime ancestor.

The museum’s Wackett was originally RAAF aircraft A3-31. It served with Number 3 Elementary Flying Training School from 13 February 1942. After the war, it was owned privately and retired in 1964.

It was the personal aircraft of Horrie Miller, one of Australia’s pioneer airmen and founder of MacRobertson Miller Airlines (MMA) which served Western Australia for 30 years before it was taken over by Ansett Airlines in the mid 1960’s. The aircraft was based in Brrome, before being transferred to the museum in 2002.

Technical information

Status: On display

Type: Two-seat primary trainer

Maiden Flight: September 19, 1939

Primary users: RAAF

Manufacturer: Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation

Number Built: 200

Civil Registration:

Length: 7.92 m (26 ft 0 in)

Height: 3.0 m (9 ft 10 in)

Wingspan: 11.28 m (37 ft 0 in)

Powerplant: Warner Super Scarab radial, 175 hp (130 kW)

Empty Weight: 866 kg (1910 lb)

Maximum Weight: 1175 kg (2590 lb)

Maximum Speed: 185 km/h (115 mph)

Range: 684 km (425 mi)

Service Ceiling:

Power/mass ratio:

Wirraway CA-5

Aircraft description

While appearing similar to the US T-6 Texan, the Wirraway was actually based on its predecessor, the NA-16. The RAAF acquired a fixed-undercarriage and a retractable-undercarriage version of this type for testing, deciding on the latter.

Wirraways were mainly operated as advanced trainers during World War II, but in the early stages of the Pacific war, some saw action against Japanese fighters and bombers – with only a little success, and many losses.

The RAAF continued to use the Wirraway as a trainer after the war, the last not being retired until 1959. Civil use was more limited, the design not being readily adapted for other tasks. A brief trial for agricultural use showed that the design was not suited for this task, however did provide a basis for the modifications that were made in producing its successful derivative, the Ceres.

The museum’s Wirraway is a Mk III, with RAAF serial A20-688. It was built in 1944 and used by the RAAF in the Eastern States until 1956, when it was transferred to RAAF Pearce. In 1959 it was decided to dispose of the aircraft, and it was transferred to the care of the Western Australian Education Department to be used for training at Midland’s Technical school aviation annexe.

Following negotiations between the technical college and the RAAF Association it was decided that the Wirraway would be transferred to the RAAFA WA Aviation Heritage Museum collection, where you can view it today.

Technical information

Status: On display

Type: Two-seat advanced trainer and general purpose military aircraft

Maiden Flight: 27th March, 1939

Primary users: RAAF, RAN

Manufacturer: Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation

Number Built: 755

Civil Registration:

Length: 8.48 m (27 ft 10 in)

Height: 2.66 m (8 ft 9 in)

Wingspan: 13.11 m (43 ft 0 in)

Powerplant: Pratt and Whitney R-1340 Wasp radial engine, 600 hp (450 kW)

Empty Weight: 1810 kg (3992 lb)

Maximum Weight: 2990 kg (6595 lb)

Maximum Speed: 350 km/h (220 mph)

Range: 1200 km (720 mi)

Service Ceiling: 7000 m (23000 ft)

Power/mass ratio: